Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco

Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco
Avenida Sol 603
Cusco, Peru

51-84-228-117
cttc@terra.com.pe
www.textilescusco.org

Contact person: Nilda Callañaupa Alvarez

Traditional-Textiles-LogoThe Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco (CTTC) is a nonprofit organization founded in 1996, when the textile traditions in the Cusco region of the Andes were in danger of disappearing. Currently working with over 450 weavers in ten communities, we manage traveling exhibits, a museum, retail stores, teaching and training centers, and provide ongoing support to our community members. Our objectives are to revive and continue the cultural heritage of textile creation, educate people to its tradition, and stimulate the production of traditional- based textiles. Tours are o ered through Andean Textile Arts (andeantextilearts.org). Our products are available in the United States through www.clothroads.com.


Bebali Foundation

Bebali Foundation
Kubu Roda, Jalan Bisma 3, Ubud,
Bali 80571, Indonesia

+62-361-976581
William@ypbb.org
www.bebali.org
www.plantmordant.org

Contact person: William Ingram

Wholesale Accounts Available

Bebali-LogoThe Bebali Foundation works with indigenous weavers in remote, underdeveloped villages across Indonesia, to incubate community businesses, responsibly manage natural-dye resources, and nurture traditional culture. The foundation’s Plant Mordant Project o ers natural dyers worldwide a unique opportunity to make reliable colors exclusively from plants by sourcing powdered leaf from the Symplocos trees as an alum substitute. It is currently developing community-based, sustainable production of indigo, Morinda red, and Ceriops brown dyes for export markets.


Ayni, Inc.

Ayni, Inc.
2345 Airline Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27607

(919) 606-9140 Hedy Hollyfield or
(703) 768-7174 Barbara Wolff

ayni_usa@yahoo.com
www.ayni-usa.org

Contact person: Hedy Hollyfield or Barbara Wolff

Ayni-logoAyni aims to preserve cultural heritage in Peru and to promote social welfare in Andean communities through sponsorship of cultural programs by selling Peruvian art and crafts. A small not-for-profit organization founded in 2006 by Hedy Hollyfield, Kathlyn Avila, and Barbara Wolff, Ayni helps to keep Ayacucho’s fiber traditions alive. Your purchase of Peruvian crafts and textiles supports cultural preservation projects in Ayacucho, Peru, as well as the communities that spin, dye, and weave the fiber.


Endangered Threads Documentaries

Endangered Threads Documentaries
1530 Tuolumne St.
Vallejo, CA 94590

(707) 643-7765
kathleen@endangeredthreads.org
www.endangeredthreads.org

Contact person: Kathleen Vitale

Wholesale Accounts Available

Endangered-threads-logoA 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit focusing on filming Maya weaving and textiles in Guatemala and southern Mexico. Endangered Threads Documentaries (ETD) DVDs document the history and practices of Maya weavers, with intimate views of their lives and art form. These documentaries will be of interest to sta and public audiences of museum exhibitions, anthropology teachers and students, fiber artists and weavers, textile enthusiasts, and travelers. ETD documentaries are used to educate Maya children on the colorful and creative history of weaving in their own culture. Spanish and English soundtracks are included on most ETD productions. Customized video loops for museums exhibiting Maya textiles are available.


Above the Fray: Traditional Hilltribe Art

Above the Fray: Traditional Hilltribe Art
2141 Crest Dr.
Eugene, OR 97405

(541) 485-9386
maren@hilltribeart.com
www.hilltribeart.com

Contact person: Maren Beck or Josh Hirschstein

Above the Fray presents handwoven, naturally dyed silk, cotton, and hemp textiles selected from independent artisans, and from village markets in the hilltribe regions of Laos and Vietnam. Developed over years of visits, our close relationships with the artists enhance our ability to represent this region’s nest traditional textile arts. In an era of rapid modernization, we recognize that these traditional artists, their hereditary art forms, and their indigenous cultures will better sustain their vitality and vibrancy if broader interest is cultivated.