Connecting with Young Members

Nicole Giacomantonio, our young WARP member from Nova Scotia, shares her experience at the annual meeting in Decorah, her reasons for embracing our group of textile enthusiasts and her hopes for the future…Judy Newland

An Adventure in Iowa

Iowa was beautiful, and Decorah was truthfully a place I never expected to find myself. I thought it great to have the opportunity to go out of the way to spend time in such a lovely town. I loved experiencing the textile culture specific to the area, especially visiting the local yarn shop, I googled it before even arriving in Decorah. I probably spent 40 minutes in there agonizing over how many skeins of locally dyed yarn I could justify buying (I showed amazing restraint and settled on just one). I found the speakers this year to be very compelling. The Alice Brown Memorial Scholarship winners gave incredible talks, and hearing them speak was a highlight of the meeting for me.

The visit to the Seed Savers Exchange truly resonated with me – I have very strong family ties, and a lot of our tradition is surrounding food. Passing seeds on to family members is such a romantic tradition; I was inspired by the stories of veggies being brought overseas with moving families. I connect this with my interest in conservation as well. The seeds are important objects of cultural heritage that should be preserved for other generations to enjoy.

Why Weave A Real Peace? Support is Everything!

I was overwhelmed with the amount of support I received from the WARP organization and from its individual members in Oaxaca last year. The connections that developed during that meeting were, and continue to be, very inspiring and enriching as I explore the paths I can take in working with textiles in my own life. It was important to me to keep those relationships strong and to show my appreciation for the organization and the people that showed me so much love right from the beginning. Not to mention the fact that the meetings are so fun and engaging, with so many opportunities to learn from and along side those who share my passion for textiles.

The connections I made during the two conferences I attended had an incredible affect on me, and I was honoured to receive so much encouragement from WARP members. I want to stay involved in WARP for many reasons. I want to show WARP the same support that the organization has shown me over the past two years. I also want to help the organization to grow and adapt, to diversify and to usher in new and younger members. Being a member of WARP provides a great opportunity to explore the many and varying ways of working with textiles and cultural heritage, and to begin exploring ways I can act as an advocate for the preservation and conservation of textile traditions both at home and abroad.

Looking Ahead

I hope for growth and diversification of the WARP organization. I also hope to keep engaging in conversations about conservation, preservation, and the responsibility we as textile enthusiasts and artists have to the owners and makers of the ethnographic textiles and cultural heritage that we support and celebrate, but that is not necessarily our own. I hope that we as an organization work to celebrate these traditions of culture and art, but also think critically of our involvement in it.

I am in the middle of creating a naturally dyed quilt. I was hoping to finish it by the end of the summer… but here we are in mid August and I’ve barely finished the top. Oh well. However, I have almost finished knitting a sweater! So, cross your fingers that I finish SOMETHING by the end of August.

I’ll be moving to Scotland in the fall! I was accepted to the Master of Textile Conservation program at the University of Glasgow. A big move, but I am very excited.

Textile conservation students at the University of Glasgow.

 

Nicole is managing our Instagram account. Look for important information on this coming soon….

 

Tinkuy 2017: A Gathering of Textile Arts in Cusco

Tinkuy 2017, celebrated in Cusco, Peru from November 8 until November 11, began with the much anticipated parade from the Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco to the Convention Centre, where the meeting was to be held. The colorful display of tradition and exuberance was clearly felt far beyond those attending the meeting. Citizens of the Cusco region and tourists alike stopped in their tracks to watch the prideful display of traditional textile techniques, many originating from far beyond the Peruvian border.

This, the third Tinkuy, came with notable additions. Formerly subtitled the “Gathering of the Weavers”, this year it was called the “Gathering of the Textile Arts”, which meant that embroiderers and specialty dyers were included in the celebration. Also, as if celebrating traditional techniques was not enough, this year the underlying theme included celebrating the continuation of tradition by including the youth. Lectures and discussion often involved ways that village members are transmitting technical information to the younger generation and also talking about how the social relevance is conveyed and maintained. Many young people attended the meeting, particularly on the last day of the conference which included a “Passing of the Torch to the Younger Generation”, a particularly poignant moment.

Every day’s packed schedule included guest textile artist presentations, which for me were particularly interesting. At this time, the artisans had an opportunity to talk about what they are doing within their communities as they move forward, how they have formulated their future plans, and how they intend to ensure that supplies will remain available and/or their deliberate return to traditional methods. They also talked about their young people and how they are tending to them and their commitment to maintaining tradition. It was humbling to listen to the effort that they are expending in keeping their creative lives meaningful for their children.

Teaching the youth.

The keynote addresses set the backdrop for the conference and tied the evidence that we were seeing around us to the textiles’ long and extensive history. That perspective really was essential, forcing the conference participants to take a deep breath and try to understand the magnitude of all that was around them.

The schedule included time for demonstrations and workshops every day. This time clearly pointed to the unspoken theme of Tinkuy – the cross pollination of ideas and techniques. This happened at so many levels – from one culture and/or village to another, from one specialty to another, from one fiber-type to another, from one country to another – and it was all truly magical.  People had come from many villages within Peru, as well as other countries within South America, such as Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. Traditional artists from Guatemala, Mexico, the United States, Canada, Afghanistan, India and Laos also attended.

People gave so much of themselves, often with so much thankfulness. Sometimes the gift came in the form of a song, sometimes in the form of a dance. Tinkuy 2017 was a special time of color, textiles, dance, music, learning and inspiration. Thank you CTTC and ATA!!

Thanks Teena for sharing your wonderful experience with all of us!

Textile Teena in her element!

Textiles and Economic Development in Ghana

This month Jackie Abrams is our guest blogger. She writes about her work with textiles and economic development in Ghana and how it has impacted her basketry.

 

My earliest recollection of being intrigued with Africa was in 3rd or 4th grade. I built an African village as a class project. I remember one of the huts – cardboard wrapped with raffia. I kept that hut with me for many years but somewhere along the way it got lost.

 

In the 1970’s, I started to collect African baskets, and books of West African painted mud homes. They spoke to me in so many ways. Both the colors and the designs started to influence some of my work. One piece in particular caught the eye of a good friend and fellow WARP member, Steve Csipke. We recognized our mutual interest in Africa. He was the man who helped my dream of working in Africa become a reality.

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My first trip was in 2005. I had the incredible good fortune to make eight trips to Africa, most often to Ghana, primarily for the purpose of helping to develop micro-craft industries with women. My last three trips, in 2008 and 2009, were in the town of Pokuase, Ghana, teaching women to crochet bags using discarded plastic bags. The goal was for their crocheting enterprise to be sustainable and for them to be able to sell their work without being dependent on me. This project was possible because of the existence of Global Mamas which is a wonderful organization that supports women making handmade products. I would say we were moderately successful in achieving our goal.

 

I learned an enormous amount about fair trade, cultural mores, and how much I will never understand about Ghanaian culture. These trips changed my life and my (art) work. The word, “simplify,” best describes these changes. I could plainly see that having any kind of joy in one’s life was not dependent on ‘stuff.’ We need enough, but we don’t really need more than that. (Who can define ‘enough’?) I feel the same about my work. I have moved away from complex forms and techniques, challenging myself to express what I want to express with more simple / straightforward techniques and materials.

I was most intrigued by the women I worked with. Informed by their lives, fabrics, and stories,  my “Women Forms” series began to develop. Each vessel tells the story of a woman. Some of them stand alone, either in strength or in sorrow. Others rejoice in the company of other women – daughters, sisters, mothers, friends. The forms contain and are shaped by the woman’s layers of experience. The inside of each piece reflects her inner strengths – strengths not always visible, that may require careful looking.

 

Textiles and economic development in ghana
Jackie Abrams

I went to Africa with the hope of enabling the women I met to create better lives for themselves and their families. In the process, they did the same for me.

Jackie Abrams just ended her term as a WARP board member. After many years as a travelling instructor, she now focuses her time on her studio practice.

Please enjoy more information about Jackie’s beautiful work at- www.jackieabrams.com

And many more stories at- http://www.jackieabrams.com/africa.html

Local Cloth

Community Organization

Local Cloth
3 High Bluff Dr.
Weaverville, NC 28787

(828) 407-0678
chairman@localcloth.org
www.localcloth.org

Judi Jetson, Chairman

Local Cloth began in 2011 when founder, Judi Jetson, then an employee of HandMade in America, imagined a new way to grow the craft economy employing the economic development strategies traditionally used in developing countries of import substitution and adding value. If we love local food, why not local fiber? Our mission is to support and sustain the regional fiber and textile arts economy and professions through collaboration, education, and innovation. We aim to grow the fiber economy in the southern Appalachian region, focusing on craft artists, fiber animal farmers, and small-scale fiber mills and processing businesses.