Cultural Appropriation – From the Inside Out, Part II

NOTA: puede ver la historia en español abajo del inglés.

By Lynda Teller Pete

Photographs by Joe Coca

Barbara Teller Ornelas in her studio

Navajo weaving is known best in the American Southwest. It is a complex art form and to us, Diné weavers, it is a living art form that permeates our families through songs, prayers, and traditions. Every step is a lesson. When Navajo weaving is mentioned in conversations, read about in literature, highlighted during lectures, or glimpsed during a television show or movie, the audience individually will conjure up their own interaction or a memory with a Navajo blanket, rug, or a tapestry.

In the Southwest it is much more common for folks to know a little about where these colorful, seemingly alike rugs come from. Appropriated designs are on clothing, stationery, kitchen ware, household furnishings, anything that screams “You are in the Southwest” and most people are not knowledgeable enough to distinguish between a Diné woven textile and a manufactured knock-off from another country.

On the next level, the more informed aficionados will know a bit more about Navajo weaving, may have grown up with rugs on the floor at their grandparents’ or their family homes, and, consequently, may have inherited some of these rugs.

And there are the collectors, scholars, native art aficionados, where history is important, the weaver is important, which regional styles are favored, the timeline of styles from early 1850s to present time, and most importantly, they know the differences in what a blanket, a rug, or a high weft count tapestry are. They know that the textiles of the weavers who hand processed their materials are more expensive than the textiles where weavers used commercial materials. However, there are more complex issues involved so they do not automatically dismiss a textile woven with commercial materials. They are aware that Navajo weaving isn’t just a craft, it is an investment in fine art and much more. At the top level, some know how Diné weavers live and weave in a myriad world of integrating ancient knowledge, cultural protocols and traditional pathways, and adapting to the present without losing any of their core concept of hózhó. Hózhó extrapolates the Diné’s understanding of harmony as it is reflected in their lives as weavers.

But let’s say someone picks up a Navajo textile and copies it and proceeds to sell said product.  It is now no longer appreciation; it is now appropriation.

Artisans of every culture around the world are suffering the outright theft of their traditional cultural work, mostly by big companies who have a slew of lawyers in place to stave off intellectual property suits.  Protecting one’s work is a constant battle.  The weavers of my family have had our design work stolen, reproduced by weavers outside this country and resold as ‘Tribal’ or ‘Ethnic’ for a fraction of what it’s worth.

The Indian Arts and Crafts Act (https://www.doi.gov/iacb/act – IACA) was created in 1935 and updated in 1990.  It is a truth-in-advertising law which prohibits misrepresentation in marketing of American Indian or Alaska Native arts and crafts products within the United States.  The law also created the Indian Arts and Crafts Board (https://www.doi.gov/iacb – IACB), an agency within the Department of the Interior whose mission is to “promote the economic development of American Indians and Alaska Natives through the expansion of the Indian arts and crafts market”. This agency processes IACA violation complaints, sends warning letters to the accused, and distributes educational literature. Even with these two agencies, the fraud that impedes the economics of Diné weavers is extensive and rampant. We are reluctant to post our textiles online because our designs will show up on manufactured household products, clothing, and paper products. Labeled Ethnic, Tribal or Native Art, they skirt the law by not labeling it Navajo.

Many non-Navajo students come to Navajo weaving classes to learn about the weaving, our culture, and our traditions.  Hopefully, these students have the benefit of an actual Navajo weaver using a Navajo loom to guide them in their learning.  Knowledge and teaching are freely given, but students are not being taught to BE Navajo weavers.  If a weaver isn’t Navajo, then Navajo weaving is not their tradition.  Students are being taught the techniques.  They are learning history and tradition.  They are being given a safe place to explore and learn about our cultural woven traditions.  Here are some guidelines for when a non-Navajo student participates in Navajo weaving.  Do not label the weaving as ‘Navajo’.  Do not sell these weavings.  These designs belong to the Navajo people.  Explore them, learn about them, but don’t sell them.  These weavings can be given as gifts or made for personal use, but they should never be made for commercial reasons.  Never copy the weaving of a known or distinctive artist without permission.  There is a fine line between learning exploration and appropriation.

The deciding factor of Navajo weaving appropriation is the recognizable use of Navajo designs. It is not the use of Navajo looms, Navajo tools, or fiber. My family and I encourage all students to expand their creative designs. My sister Barbara and I have on occasion received push back for teaching Navajo weaving to non-Navajos.  Education and sharing lead to survival and an open world.  We want people to learn more about the Navajo people and Navajo weaving. Barbara and I deeply respect and guard our sacred traditions.  We bring sample designs for our beginning weaving classes that are simple and are designed to teach specific weaving techniques such as hook joins or diagonals, to move designs to the right first, then move to the left without adding a new weft.  The designs are simple, and we have three levels, easy, medium, and challenging.  We have discussions on what is appropriate for Navajo beginning students and what is appropriate for non-Navajo students. We encourage and assist the non-Navajo students to come up with a design that is meaningful for them within their design sense and/or their own cosmology.

The second book by Lynda Teller Pete and Barbara Teller Ornelas published by Thrums Books, to be released in October of 2020.

Very importantly we stress to please NEVER weave or create Yei or Sand Paintings in their textiles.  These are sacred to the Navajo people.  We have entire traditions and cultural protocols dedicated to who creates them, how, and when they should be used. Weaving these designs should be done by those who are Navajo, understand this cosmology, and are part of the tradition.  The fact that the tourist industry ignores it is not an excuse to do it. Diné weavers weave Sand Paintings and Yei rugs and market them and there is no harm in buying one to decorate your home.  Most often these rugs are woven by seasoned Diné weavers who observe proper protocols, who are initiated into these ways.

Cultural Appropriation is a complicated and nuanced issue.  In addressing this issue, we are trying to preserve the work of our ancestors and the traditions that belong to the Navajo people.  It is at the same time intellectual property, cultural identity, and a spiritual imperative.  There is no easy answer that will address the damage done by past injustice or current wrongs.  What we seek is to create an increased awareness and a change in many current attitudes.

Lynda Teller Pete and Barbara Teller Ornelas have written two books about Navajo weaving, both published by Thrums Books (.com). Spider Woman’s Children, which tells the stories of contemporary Navajo weavers, came out in 2018. How to Weave a Navajo Rug and Other Lessons from Spider Woman will appear in October of 2020 and you are the first to see the cover. This essay is an adaptation from the new book. To read our previous post by Lynda, please click here.

 


Apropiación Cultural de Adentro Hacia Afuera

Autor: Lynda Teller Pete

Fotografías de Joe Coca

Las hermanas Teller

El tejido navajo es mejor conocido en el Suroeste de EEUU. Es un arte complejo y para nosotros, los tejedoras diné, es un arte vivo que impregna nuestras familias atreves de canciones, oraciones, y tradiciones. Cada paso es una lección. Cuando un tejido navajo es mencionado en conversaciones, leído en literatura, tocado en presentaciones, o visto en un programa de televisión o una película, cada persona en la audiencia va a tener su propia reacción, interacción, o memoria de una chamara, una alfombra, o un tapiz navajo.

En el Suroeste es común que la gente sabe un poco de dónde vienen estas alfombras coloridas que parecen muy similares – pero tal vez sólo un poco. Encontrará diseños apropiados en ropa, papel de escribir, cosas para la cocina, muebles, cualquier cosa que grita “¡Está en el Suroeste!” y la mayoría de gente no sabe suficiente para distinguir entre un tejido navajo/diné y uno falso fabricado en otro país.

En el próximo nivel los aficionados mejor informados saben un poco más sobre los tejidos navajos, tal vez crecieron con una alfombra en el piso de la casa de sus abuelos o familia, y posiblemente por eso heredó una o más de estas alfombras.

Y también están los coleccionistas, escolares, aficionados del arte nativo, donde la historia es importante, la tejedora es importante, cuáles estilos regionales son más favorecidos, la línea de tiempo desde temprano en los 1850s a hoy en día, y lo más importante, ellos saben la diferencia entre una chamara, una alfombra, y un tapiz con alta cuenta de trama. Saben que los textiles de las tejedoras que hacen todo el proceso a mano valen más que los donde las tejedoras usan materiales comerciales. Sin embargo, hay factores más complicados involucrados entonces ellos no descarten automáticamente los textiles con materiales comerciales. Están conscientes que los tejidos navajos no son sólo artesanía, son una inversión en arte fino y mucho más. Al nivel más alto, algunos conocen como las tejedoras dinés viven y tejen en un mundo integrando conocimientos ancestrales, protocolos culturales y senderos tradicionales, y adaptándose al presente sin perder su concepto fundamental de hózhó. Hózhó extrapola el entendimiento diné de la harmonía como está reflejado en sus vidas como tejedoras.

Pero déjenos decir que alguien toma un tejido navajo y lo copia y vende su producto. Esto no es apreciación, es apropiación.

Artesanos de cada cultura en el mundo están sufriendo el robo de su trabajo tradicional y cultural, más que todo por empresas grandes que tienen un montón de abogados trabajando para evitar los litigios de propiedad intelectual. Proteger el trabajo de uno es una lucha constante. Las tejedoras de mi familia han tenido nuestros diseños robados, reproducidos por tejedoras afuera de este país, y vendido como “Tribal” o “Étnico” por una fracción de su valor.

El Acta de Arte y Artesanía Indígena (https://www.doi.gov/iacb/act) (IACA – sus siglas en inglés) fue creada en 1935 y actualizada en 1990. Es una ley de verdad-en-publicidad que prohíbe la representación falsa en mercadeo del trabajo de los indígenas de América y Alaska dentro de los Estados Unidos. La ley también creó el Comité de Arte y Artesanía Indígena (https://www.doi.gov/iacb) (IACB – sus siglas en inglés), una agencia dentro del Departamento del Interior que tiene como misión “promover el desarrollo económico de los indios americanos y nativos de Alaska por la expansión del mercado para las artes y artesanía indígena”. Esta agencia procesa las quejas de violaciones de IACA, manda cartas de aviso a los acusados, y distribuye literatura educacional. Aun con estas dos agencias, el fraude que impide las economías de las tejedoras dinés es extenso y desenfrenado. Nosotros no queremos poner nuestros textiles en línea porque nuestros diseños van a aparecer en productos para casas, ropa, y productos de papel. Con etiquetas que dicen “Étnico”, “Tribal”, o “Arte Nativo”, ellos evitan la ley no usando la palabra “Navajo”.

Muchas estudiantes no-navajo vienen a los cursos de tejer para aprender sobre los tejidos, nuestra cultura, y nuestras tradiciones. Esperamos que ellas tengan el beneficio de tener una tejedora navajo usando un telar navajo para guiarlas en su aprendizaje. Conocimiento y enseñanza están dados libremente, pero las estudiantes no están enseñadas a SER tejedoras navajos. Si una tejedora no es navajo, entonces los tejidos navajos no son su tradición. A las estudiantes se les enseñan las técnicas. Ellas están aprendiendo la historia y tradición. Tienen un espacio seguro para explorar y aprender sobre nuestras tradiciones culturales de tejidos. Aquí son unas guías para un estudiante no-navajo aprendiendo a tejer navajo: No etiquetar el tejido como navajo. No vende estos tejidos. Estos diseños pertenecen a la gente navajo. Explore, aprenda, pero no venda. Puede darlos como regalos, o los usan para uso personal, pero nunca deberían estar hechos por razones comerciales. Nunca copia los tejidos de una artista bien conocida o muy distinta sin permiso. Hay una fina línea entre explorar y apropiar.

El factor decisivo de apropiación de tejidos navajos es el uso reconocible de diseños navajos. No es el uso de los telares navajos, herramientas navajos, ni fibras. Con mi familia animamos a nuestras estudiantes a expandir sus diseños creativos. Mi hermana Bárbara y yo a veces recibimos presiones por enseñar a tejer navajo a gente que no son navajo. Educación y compartiendo conducen a sobrevivencia y un mundo abierto. Queremos que la gente aprenda más sobre el pueblo navajo y los tejidos navajos. Bárbara y yo tenemos respeto profundo y guardamos nuestras tradiciones sagradas. Traemos ejemplos de diseños para nuestras estudiantes principiantes sencillos y diseñados para enseñar técnicas específicas como hook joins o diagonales, para mover diseños hacia la derecha primero, y después moverlos hacia la izquierda sin añadir trama nueva. Los diseños son sencillos, y tenemos tres niveles, fácil, mediano, y complejo. Tenemos conversaciones sobre lo que es conveniente para estudiantes principiantes navajos y lo que es conveniente para estudiantes no-navajos. Animamos y atendemos las estudiantes no-navajo para crear un diseño que significa algo para ellas con su propio sentido de diseño y/o cosmología.

Algo muy importante es que insistimos que ellas NUNCA tejan ni crean los Yei o Pinturas de Arena en sus textiles. Estos son sagrados para el pueblo navajo. Tenemos tradiciones completas y protocolos culturales dedicados a quién los crea, cómo, y cuándo deberían ser usados. Tejer estos diseños debería estar circunscrito a quienes son navajos, entienden esta cosmología, y son parte de la tradición. El hecho que la industria de turismo lo ignora no es una excusa para hacerlo. Tejedoras dinés tejen alfombras con Yei y Pinturas de Arena y las venden, y no hay daño en comprar una para decorar su casa. Más frecuentemente estas alfombras son tejidas por tejedoras dinés muy educadas para observar protocolos correctos, tejedoras quienes son iniciadas en la vía sagrada.

Disponible de www.thrumsbooks.com

Apropiación Cultural es un tema complicado y matizado. Al enfrentarlo, estamos tratando de preservar el trabajo de nuestros antepasados y las tradiciones que pertenecen al pueblo navajo. Al mismo tiempo es propiedad intelectual, identidad cultural, e imperativo espiritual. No hay una respuesta fácil que conteste el daño hecho por injusticia pasada ni errores de hoy en día. Lo que buscamos es crear una consciencia amplia y un cambio en muchas actitudes corrientes.

 

Lynda Teller Pete y Barbara Teller Ornelas han escrito dos libros sobre tejidos navajos, los dos publicados por Thrums Books (.com). Los Hijos de Mujer Araña, 2018, cuenta las historias de tejedoras (y tres hombres) navajos contemporáneas. Como Tejer una Alfombra Navajo y Otras Lecciones de Mujer Araña va a aparecer en octubre de 2020, y ustedes son los primeros que vean la portada. Esto artículo es una adaptación del libro nuevo.

 

2 comments on “Cultural Appropriation – From the Inside Out, Part II

  1. Lynda, This is so good. Thank you for a worthy contribution to the discussion, the struggle.
    Esto es muy bueno. Gracias, Lynda, por su contribución tan valiosa a la conversación, la lucha.
    Education and sharing lead to survival and an open world.
    Educación y compartiendo conducen a sobrevivencia y un mundo abierto.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *